Erewash diversion

At the end of 2009, we completed a project designed to divert poor quality water from upstream farming and industrial areas away from the nature reserve.
 

Erewash diversion

At the end of 2009, we completed a project designed to divert poor quality water from upstream farming and industrial areas away from the nature reserve.

It was in the 1970s that the previous banks of the Erewash were excavated in order to allow barges to carry sand and gravel through the lake complex to the processing plant site at Attenborough. As a result, the river discharged into the lakes rather than directly into the Trent as it used to.

More recently, parts of the lake complex have been recognised for their nature conservation interest and have achieved SSSI status. It was, however, evident that the quality of water in the Erewash was poor and that was contaminated with phosphate and nitrogen rich water. This showed itself with algal blooms within the lakes.

As part of our plan to extract gravel from the area known as Thrumpton’s Land, it was agreed that CEMEX should devise a scheme to improve water quality in Attenborough’s eastern lake. This involved construction of an embankment across the eastern side of the eastern lake which would effectively create a new river bank and direct the main flow south into the Trent. A six-metre gap was left to allow passage for barges.

In addition to the embankment, the scheme also involved construction of a new weir to maintain levels in the reserve and keep debris out of the Trent. The weir (pictured above) incorporates a bridge, public footpath and “ladder” which allows fish to leap in stages into the Erewash and the reserve beyond. It’s the first time in 50 years that fish have been able to swim into these stretches.

Contact Information

To make a comment or for further information please contact Mark Kelly at planninggb@cemex.com.


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